Wireless Brain–Spine Interface Could Help Paraplegics Walk Again




Non-human primates have regained control of their paralyzed leg thanks to a neuroprosthetic interface that acts as a wireless bridge between the brain and spine, bypassing the injury. The interface was developed in an international collaboration led by EPFL. A feasibility clinical study has begun at the Lausanne University Hospital in Switzerland to test the therapeutic effects of the spine-part of the interface in people with spinal cord injury.
Source: EPFL
Read more: actu.epfl.ch
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Brain Implant, Paralyzed, Neuroprosthetic Interface, Neuroscience, Paraplegics, Brain-Computer Interface, The Future of Medicine, Neurotechnology

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