Wireless Brain–Spine Interface Could Help Paraplegics Walk Again




Non-human primates have regained control of their paralyzed leg thanks to a neuroprosthetic interface that acts as a wireless bridge between the brain and spine, bypassing the injury. The interface was developed in an international collaboration led by EPFL. A feasibility clinical study has begun at the Lausanne University Hospital in Switzerland to test the therapeutic effects of the spine-part of the interface in people with spinal cord injury.
Source: EPFL
Read more: actu.epfl.ch
Paralyzed
Implants
Brain-Computer Interfaces
Neuroscience News
Neuroscience Books
Prosthetics
The Future of Medicine
The Future of Surgery
Brain Implant, Paralyzed, Neuroprosthetic Interface, Neuroscience, Paraplegics, Brain-Computer Interface, The Future of Medicine, Neurotechnology

Donate BTC: 1DUUZbiqjbJvzjuRZEwTS47bqgmnhEJ4XG

Donate ETH: 0x981FcEAAa895C6cee76D2876e9AfC649Dc0C4c75

More Posts:

Windows To Evolve Into Solar Power Generators
Culturally Rich, Sustainable, Space-Efficient: Cultural Center For Sabah Al Ahmad Sea City
Innovative & Independent Bike Rental System
Google Glasses: Directional Sound & Speech To The Deaf
iPhone 5 Commercial (Concept)
The Microsoft Patent Application Puts You In The Game
CSR Paper-Thin Bluetooth Keyboard - Engadget at IFA 2013
Virtual Reality & The Future of the Web
ReFlex: Revolutionary Flexible Smartphone Allows Users To Feel The Buzz By Bending Their Apps
Ray Kurzweil Predicts When We'll Be Able to Program Matter