Rats Were Taught To Detect Infrared Light (+VIDEO)



future, neuroprosthesis, rats, Duke university, brain-machine interfaces, tech news, future technology, Miguel Nicolelis, futuristic
Scientists at the Duke University have recently conducted a study, which signifies huge advance in the field of Brain Machine Interfaces, and could in future be used to restore motion to the paralyzed and sight to the blind. They have developed a neuroprosthesis that enables rats to detect infrared light by sense of touch. In the course of the experiment the rats were placed into a chamber containing three LED lights above a small port; when any of those lights came on, they would be rewarded with a sip of water if they stuck their nose in the port underneath it. Infrared detectors were then attached to the rats’ foreheads, and wired into their brains using an array of stimulating microelectrodes. The LEDs were replaced with infrared lights and when the rats were returned to the chamber, their detectors would send their brains a “touch” signal whenever one of the lights illuminated. In a month the rats learned to associate those signals with the lights. Researchers are sure that cortical neuroprostheses like this could be improved to give animals or humans the ability to see any part of the electromagnetic spectrum or even magnetic fields. Miguel Nicolelis, the neurobiologist who led the research claims that “We could create devices sensitive to any physical energy. It could be magnetic fields, radio waves, or ultrasound.”
Via:popsci.com, gizmag.com
future, neuroprosthesis, rats, Duke university, brain-machine interfaces, tech news, future technology, Miguel Nicolelis, futuristic

future, neuroprosthesis, rats, Duke university, brain-machine interfaces, tech news, future technology, Miguel Nicolelis, futuristic


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