Electronic Tattoos Will Control Machines Via The Mind



future, electronic tattoos, Todd Coleman, future device, future technology, University of California, San Diego, flexible electronics, futuristic
A group of scientists led by Todd Coleman at the University of California at San Diego is developing wireless flexible electronics one can apply on the forehead just like temporary tattoos to read brain activity. Electronic tattoos are almost invisible on skin, cause they’re about 100 microns thick. They are made of a circuitry embedded in a layer or rubbery polyester that allow them to stretch, bend and wrinkle. The tattoos can detect electrical signals linked with brain waves; they include solar cells for power and antennas that allow them to communicate wirelessly or receive energy. Todd Coleman claims that, If placed on the throat, these gadgets could act as subvocal microphones through which people could communicate silently and wirelessly. This noninvasive means of controlling machines via the mind might in future enable people to fly drones with only thought and talk seemingly telepathically without speech over smartphones.
Via:txchnologist.com
future, electronic tattoos, Todd Coleman, future device, future technology, University of California, San Diego, flexible electronics, futuristic

future, electronic tattoos, Todd Coleman, future device, future technology, University of California, San Diego, flexible electronics, futuristic

Donate BTC: 1DUUZbiqjbJvzjuRZEwTS47bqgmnhEJ4XG

Donate ETH: 0x981FcEAAa895C6cee76D2876e9AfC649Dc0C4c75

More Posts:

Fighting The Greenhouse Effect, Saving Space and Environment: Dishwasher On Mission
Perfectly Insulated Pearl Opera House
Honda Motor Compo: Electric Scooter & Backup Energy Source
Underwater Turbine Tested Successfully In Scotland
Toshiba’s Quadrupedal Nuclear Disaster-ready Robot
Grasshopper Hoverslam | Ring of Fire (VIDEO)
Dave Ferguson - Self-driving cars - Google X
Honda Automatic Driverless Valet Parking System
Microsoft Imagines The Future For NFL Fans With HoloLens
Japan Launches World’s First Robot Table Tennis Tutor