Transient Electronics Decomposing In Water (+VIDEO)



biodegradable electronics, Transient Electronics, biodegradable electronics technology, new technologies, futuristic technology, the future of medical technology, University of Illinois
Researchers at the University of Illinois, in collaboration with Tufts University and Northwestern University have made a revolutionary invention of a new type of biodegradable electronics technology, called ‘transient Electronics‘.The team has already built transient transistors, diodes, wireless power coils, temperature and strain sensors, photodetectors, solar cells, radio oscillators and antennas, and digital cameras. All these electronics are made of ultrathin sheets of silicon, magnesium, silk and other biocompatible materials, that completely dissolve in water from a couple of minutes to a few years, depending on the structure of the silk. Transient Electronics might have a wide range of applications in medical field, e.g. in medical implants to perform important diagnostic or therapeutic functions for a certain amount of time and then dissolve in the body. Wireless sensors could be dispersed after a chemical spill and then degrade over time to eliminate any ecological impact. Consumer electronic systems or sub-components would reduce electronic waste generated by products that are frequently upgraded, such as mobile devices.
Via:psfk.com

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