Experimental Music Performances With Facial Movements (+VIDEO)



future, futuristic, Daito Manabe, Tokyo, innovative technology projects, Creators Project, innovative projects, Manabe’s projects,  new technologies, technology news, futurist technology
One of the new technology projects from the programmer and artist Daito Manabe based in Tokyo, Japan, centres on experimental music performances and connects a person’s face to electric sensors. This innovative system lets you ‘play’ your face like a musical instrument with the help of facial movements that trigger sounds. Electrical stimulation makes a face twitch involuntary, each twitch matches the beat of the music. You can watch a short video from The Creators Project describing Manabe’s projects.

Via:psfk.com, daito.ws
future, futuristic, Daito Manabe, Tokyo, innovative technology projects, Creators Project, innovative projects, Manabe’s projects,  new technologies, technology news, futurist technology

future, futuristic, Daito Manabe, Tokyo, innovative technology projects, Creators Project, innovative projects, Manabe’s projects,  new technologies, technology news, futurist technology

future, futuristic, Daito Manabe, Tokyo, innovative technology projects, Creators Project, innovative projects, Manabe’s projects,  new technologies, technology news, futurist technology

future, futuristic, Daito Manabe, Tokyo, innovative technology projects, Creators Project, innovative projects, Manabe’s projects,  new technologies, technology news, futurist technology


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