See The First Totally Computer Modeled Organism



Mycoplasma genitalium
Mycoplasma genitalium is a bacterial parasite that became the first complete organism to have its genome modeled in a computer program by scientists at Stanford and the J. Craig Venture Institute. Despite the fact that this pathogen is the smallest and simplest organism existing, bacteria still remain incredibly complex. The scientists have lead a tremendous work, as each and every one of M. genitalium’s 525 genes is in charge of the interactions of RNA, DNA, metabolites, proteins, and 24 other unique categories of molecules, and all of them work together. Understanding how the organism operates on such a level of details is vital for disease detection and treatment. This “bio-CAD” (computer-aided design) may guide to the new medicines and bioengineering techniques development, resulting in laboratories performing experiments through only simulation at high speed. That might result in synthetic forms of life specially made to cheaply manufacture complex pharmaceuticals.
Via: dvice.com


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