A Handy Sound Camera Detects Both Stationary And Moving Noise Sources (+VIDEO)



future, SeeSV-S205, sound camera, future devices, Red Dot, product design, futuristic concept, SM Instrument, futuristic
SM Instrument Company in collaboration with the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology has designed a smart sound camera that will be really helpful for those working with machines and appliances. The pentagon-shaped SeeSV-S205 sound camera takes a picture, which shows you the source of the noise. The device has three handles on the back, and with a total weight of 1.78 kg (3.9 lb) it can be easily held in one hand. Unlike other sound cameras, it’s smaller and lighter, because it’s limited to noises between 350 Hz and 12 kHz. It features 30 MEMS microphones that can detect and locate both stationary and moving noise sources thanks to the beamforming algorithm. A high-resolution optical camera located in the middle of the device records images at a rate of 25 per second. The output from the microphones and the optical camera are displayed on a linked computer; they’re combined to show both a real-time image of the subject, with a thermograph-like color-coded overlay that indicates the location(s) with the loudest noise.
Via:gizmag.com
future, SeeSV-S205, sound camera, future devices, Red Dot, product design, futuristic concept, SM Instrument, futuristic

future, SeeSV-S205, sound camera, future devices, Red Dot, product design, futuristic concept, SM Instrument, futuristic

future, SeeSV-S205, sound camera, future devices, Red Dot, product design, futuristic concept, SM Instrument, futuristic

future, SeeSV-S205, sound camera, future devices, Red Dot, product design, futuristic concept, SM Instrument, futuristic


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