Stanford Engineers Develop A Wireless, Fully Implantable Device To Stimulate Nerves In Mice




A device the size of a peppercorn can activate neurons of the brain, spinal cord or limbs in mice and is powered wirelessly using the mouse’s own body to transfer energy. Developed by a Stanford Bio-X team, the device is the first to deliver optogenetic nerve stimulation in a fully implantable format.
Read more: Stanford University
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Futuristic Technology, Neuroscience, Brain, Optogenetics, Wireless Charging, Implants, Cyborg, Augmentation, Stanford University

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