Stanford Engineers Develop A Wireless, Fully Implantable Device To Stimulate Nerves In Mice




A device the size of a peppercorn can activate neurons of the brain, spinal cord or limbs in mice and is powered wirelessly using the mouse’s own body to transfer energy. Developed by a Stanford Bio-X team, the device is the first to deliver optogenetic nerve stimulation in a fully implantable format.
Read more: Stanford University
Neuroscience News
Neuroscience Books
Wireless Charging
Implants
Cyborgization
Futuristic Technology, Neuroscience, Brain, Optogenetics, Wireless Charging, Implants, Cyborg, Augmentation, Stanford University

Donate BTC: 1DUUZbiqjbJvzjuRZEwTS47bqgmnhEJ4XG

Donate ETH: 0x981FcEAAa895C6cee76D2876e9AfC649Dc0C4c75

More Posts:

Productivity Future Vision
The House Hiding Underground During Natural Disasters
Mantarobot To Swim Underwater (+VIDEO)
LED Lights Will Ensure Healthy Sleep For The Astronauts
An Unusual Mannequin Features Kinect Advertising (+VIDEO)
Unreal Engine 4
3D-Printed Material Can Carry 160,000 Times Its Own Weight
Tiny Nuclear Explosions Will Power Aircrafts, Reveals A New Patent From Boeing
Rice Students Aim To Help Patients With Intractable Epilepsy Through Neurostimulator Implants
Robots Can Now Sense Your Emotions Via Radio Waves