Ocean Cleanup Array Could Remove Plastic Garbage From The World’s Oceans



future, Ocean Cleanup Array, Best Technical Design 2012, Boyan Slat, new technologies, tech news, future technology, TEDxDelft 2012, futuristic
The Ocean Cleanup Foundation is a non-profit organization responsible for the development of the technologies directed to clean  plastic particles from the ocean’s garbage patches. Its founder, Boyan Slat, has recently revealed a project aimed at creating an Ocean Cleanup Array that could remove 7,250,000 tons of plastic waste from the world’s oceans in five years. The device consists of an anchored network of floating booms and processing platforms that could be dispatched to garbage patches around the world. The array would span the radius of a garbage patch, acting as a giant funnel; the angle of the booms would force plastic in the direction of the platforms, where it would be separated from plankton, filtered and stored for recycling. This audacious project unveiled at the TEDxDelft 2012 could save hundreds of thousands of aquatic animals annually, and reduce pollutants from building up in the food chain. Furthermore, it could also save millions per year in clean-up costs, lost tourism and damage to marine vessels. The main idea behind the project is to increase awareness about the world’s plastic garbage patches.
Via:inhabitat.com
future, Ocean Cleanup Array, Best Technical Design 2012, Boyan Slat, new technologies, tech news, future technology, TEDxDelft 2012, futuristic

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